Sailing Search Engine:

Up goes the mast!

3.   Once the mast is securely fastened - up she goes. It is interesting to watch the mast bend as it is lifted. It goes to show the flexibility of the mast and also its strength.

Up goes the mast!

Lifting is the easy bit. Next stage is to slot it into position and secure it at keel level. There is a bit of a debate about whether keel stepped or desk stepped is better.

As will be fairly obvious, the base of a mast has a vertical and horizontal thrust to it that tries to push it down through the bottom of the boat and also sideward off of the mast step. In normal conditions the down load is many times greater than the side load. Beyond the loads imparted to the boat, there is also the issue of the loads that happen internally in a mast. When you look at the structure of a mast it is really a truss standing on end but it does not completely act as truss because the components of a truss are not supposed to have bending loads on them. Ideally the loads in the mast are primarily axial (acting along the length of the mast) rather than in bending (acting perpendicular to the long axis of the mast). Of course masts do have fairly large bending loads imparted into them. The two most often cited reasons for keel stepped masts being considered stronger is the way that the bending loads (moments) are distributed within the mast itself and the way that the mast imparts its loads into the boat.

If the goal of designing a mast is to reduce bending moments within a mast, the greater the number of panels (segments between shrouds and other supports) the smaller the moments tend to be. In the days when single spreader rigs were most common a keel-stepped mast added one extra panel, the segment between the mast partners at the deck and the keel. This has become less significant as bigger boats have routinely gone to multiple spreader rigs and moment connections at the deck mounted mast steps.

If the mast is not tied to the deck or the deck tied to the keel near the mast, either with a tie rod or a tie from the mast to the deck and a connection from the mast to the keel, the downward force of the mast working in opposition to the upward loads of the shrouds can pull the hull together like a bow and arrow lifting the deck and separating the joint between bulkheads and the deck.

Not only do keel stepped masts impart vertical loads into the deck but they also typically end up imparting side loads as well.

This page has been viewed 2395 times.


Index - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - Next

Can you add to this page? - Add your own local knowledge, comments or feedback, and this will be added to the page. All submissions are reviewed. Include your e-mail and we will let you know once the web site has been updated.

Name:    E-mail address:
Your comment here:

Antispam code:

Latest News


Sea Dreamer collage